Saturday, August 12, 2017

LAST TWO DAYS: Making Space

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Works by DOROTHY DEHNER and ANNE RYAN are in Making Space: Women Artists and Post-War Abstraction at the Museum of Modern Art, NY. The exhibition ends tomorrow, Sunday, August 13, 2017. The paintings, prints, sculpture, ceramics, and drawings, date from the end of the Second World War, 1945, to the beginning of the Feminist Movement, 1968.
 
A work at the Gallery: Anne Ryan, Collage, 1951
A label for the show notes “Abstraction dominated artistic practice during these years, as many artists working in the aftermath of World War II sought an international language that might transcend national and regional narratives – and for women artists, additionally, those relating to gender.” One might add that the figure had become too banal to paint.

The nearly 100 works in many mediums by more than 50 artists (including women from Europe, the Americas, and Japan), form an ethereal and mesmerizing exhibition. Of course we were especially pleased to see both Dorothy Dehner and Anne Ryan included and then so intrigued to find them nearly side-by-side. Dehner is represented by a single piece of six bronze parts, Enounter, 1969; Ryan by four collages.


Link to our Dorothy Dehner page:
http://www.susantellergallery.com/cgi/STG_art.pl?artist=dehner

Linke to our Anne Ryan page:
http://www.susantellergallery.com/cgi/STG_art.pl?artist=ryan





DorothyDehner, Dehner, Anneryan, MakingSpace, Museumofmodernart,
MOMA 

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#DorothyDehner #Dehner #Anneryan #MakingSpace #Museumofmodernart
#MOMA

Saturday, July 29, 2017

National Dance Day

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Saturday, July 29

National Dance Day


Hugh Mesibov, Dancers, 1938

Hugh Mesibov’s lithograph Dancers, 1938, was made at the WPA Printmaking Shop in Philadelphia. It was agreed that he could make a print using several colors, but had to let a colleague make a black and white lithograph in between. Consequently it took several months to complete the image and when it was done ‘they’ (Michael J. Gallagher?) decided against publishing it.

Peggy Bacon, Promenade, 1935

Peggy Bacon would certainly been among the first to celebrate National Dance Day (established in 2010). This Woodstock, square dancing scene from about 1935 is a drawing destined for the Art About the Arts page but a quirk kept it from showing up. I’m not giving up, but today is a perfect chance to show it off.

Sunday, July 16, 2017

ANNE RYAN'S SPIDER


Right now The Metropolitan Museum of Art has a fascinating group of arachnidan images up in their Drawings and Prints Gallery, just to the left of the top of the Grand Staircase. We are suggesting yet another on this rarified theme: The Spider, Anne Ryan, 1944, intaglio, 9 x 7 inches.

 
Anne Ryan, The Spider, 1944



anneryan, spider, aracnid, metropolitanmuseum

Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Happpy Fourth of July!





 
Christina Blatt, Marco Sees the Statue of Liberty, 2009

 


This gouache drawing is from Christina Blatt’s book Marco Comes to New York.



ChristinaBlatt, StatueofLiberty, LadyLiberty, FourthofJuly, 4thofjuly, 
IndependenceDay

Friday, June 30, 2017

ANNA PINTO at the Grolier Club


A piece by ANNA PINTO is featured in The Calligraphy Revival, 1906-2016, at The Grolier Club, 47 East 60th Street, New York City, on view May 17 through July 29, 2017.

Anna Pinto at The Calligraphy Revival show. Her piece is just to her left.

Pulling primarily from his own collection, the calligrapher and curator Jerry Kelly dated the exhibition to the publication of Edward Johnston’s manual, Writing & Illuminating, & Lettering, in 1906. Covering more than a century with only one work for each scribe Kelley was able to include pieces by Rudolf Koch from 1912, Johnston from 1916, an Eric Gill from 1923, and the Pinto from 2016.


Anna Pinto, An Alphabet, 1994

Most works are in Latin script and often honor the concept of the alphabet -- that Kelly recognizes as ‘One of the major accomplishments of mankind.' Usually on paper, there are also examples of Hebrew, Arabic, Japanese, and Tibetan, and carvings on wood, glass, and slate, as well as serigraphs, collages, and a stunning wood engraving by Leo Wyatt. If the Wyatt is an exercise in planning and control, Georgia Deaver’s lyric double study is a riot of color and gesture with brushstrokes that demand equally careful examination.


Anna Pinto, Collette IV 2012
Although most pieces are British or American, also included are works from Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Estonia, France, Germany, and Italy. Kelly’s labels help connect teacher to student and sometimes recall ancient Rome and royal families. His own contribution is a wonder.

The Grolier Club is always worth visiting and this is the perfect summer show, for them and for us.

Link to Anna Pinto page on Gallery site:

Link to Grolier Club:
http://www.grolierclub.org/Default.aspx?p=DynamicModule&pageid=289912&ssid=169182&vnf=1


GrolierClub, Calligraphy, CalligraphyRevival, AnnaPinto, EdwardJohnston, EricGill, JerryKelly, GeorgiaDeaver, LeoWyatt

#GrolierClub #Calligraphy #CalligraphyRevival #AnnaPinto #EdwardJohnston #EricGill #JerryKelly #GeorgiaDeaver #LeoWyatt

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

JOE JONES

 

The Restless Regionalist: The Art of Joe Jones

June 9 though September 10, 2017
The Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, St. Joseph, Missouri

November 4, 2017 through January 14, 2018
Birger Sandzen Gallery, Lindsborg, Kansas

Sixty works by Joseph John Jones (1909-1963) are shown in the Restless Regionalist. Born in St. Louis in difficult circumstances, he made New Deal murals in both Missouri and Kansas, and served as a Combat Artist during World War II. Our loan to the exhibition is of Jones by colleague Edward Laning while they were in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska during the War.

Edward Laning, Joe Jones, 1943, sepia ink drawing (detail shown), 8 x 11 inches, signed and titled in ink. A typed note reads “Drawn in the Aleutians as correspondent for the War Department Art Unit.”

Jones made paintings, lithographs, and serigraphs, and was a remarkably skilled self-taught draftsman: he is one of very few artists to have made several covers for Time magazine. Associated American Artists, New York City, published sixteen of his prints.
 
 Joe Jones, Nude, about 1935, lithograph 
While many of Jones’ early works reflect his home-state’s farming and rural communities, throughout his career he spoke to serious social issues, especially racism, economic hardship, and workers rights.



Link to the Gallery’s Joe Jones page:





restlessregionalist, joejones, edwardlaning, Aleutians, WarDepartmentArtUnit WarCorrespondent Combatartist, NewDeal, NewDealMura,l associatedamericanartists regionalism americanregionalism Stlouis, Albrecht-Kemper, BirgerSandzen


#restlessregionalist #joejones #edwardlaning #Aleutians #WarDepartmentArtUnit #WarCorrespondent #Combatartist #NewDeal #NewDealMural #associatedamericanartists #regionalism #americanregionalism
#Stlouis #Albrecht-Kemper #BirgerSandzen

Friday, June 9, 2017

Back at Last!



This week our loans to Innovation and Abstraction: Women Artists and Atelier 17
were returned to us and we’re celebrating!

Innovation and Abstraction began August 4 last summer, 2016, at the Pollock-Krasner House in East Hampton and traveled to the Zimmerli Art Museum, New Brunswick, NJ, where it ran through Wednesday, May 31.

Sue Fuller, Collage, 1944





Dr. Christina Weyl, selected eight artists from the more than ninety women who worked at the New York Atelier 17 between 1940 and 1955. Of course we were also thrilled to see pieces by Alice Trumbull Mason, Dorothy Dehner, and Worden Day in the show as well. 

 
Sue Fuller, Cacophony, first state, 1944

Shown here are the three pieces related to Sue Fuller’s Cacophony, 1944. The first is Collage, probably made of a string onion-bag tweaked into two standing women and mounted on a support sheet. The title gives it independent standing. The second is a first state of Fuller’s print Cacophony, 1944. The intaglio was clearly made from the sting of Collage; many areas were blocked out to isolate the figures. Then, the final state. There could have been any number of intermediate states between first and final, but Fuller chose to preserve these two. The final has so many overlapping patterns of, probably, doilies and lace, and use of sugar lift, that it’s hard to keep track. It is a soft-ground extravaganza.


Sue Fuller, Cacophony, final state, 1944

While women were extremely hard to find at Stanley William Hayter’s earlier, Paris, Atelier 17, in NYC Fuller was a master printer, credited with technical innovations adapted by the studio.

Link to Weyl’s essay and checklist;

STG listing for Women of Atelier 17
Our list includes a few other artists including Worden Day, Fannie Hillsmith and Kett.

#innovationandabstraction #womenartists #atelier17 #pollock-krasnerhouse #minnacitron #suefuller #wordenday #dorothydehner #alicetrumbullmason #anneryan #susanteller #collage #zimmerli #innovation #stanleywilliamhayter #printmaking

innovationandabstraction, womenartists, atelier17, pollock-krasnerhouse, minnacitron, suefuller, wordenday, dorothydehner, alicetrumbullmason, anneryan, collage, susanteller, zimmerli, innovation, stanleywilliamhayter, printmaking